1. Learn More

The Quality Personnel Solutions (QPS) system provides school districts with the training and resources to guide building administrators in a fair and practical response to chronically under-performing teachers. The system is a positive, step-by-step approach providing administrators with the tools and confidence to deal effectively with a difficult aspect of their job while lessening the potential for confrontation in the process. The training is for anyone who supervises, observes, or evaluates teachers, i.e. principals, assistant principals, curriculum specialists, HR directors, and other central office...

2. Personnel Management

Training includes, but is not limited to, forms and guidelines for understanding Teacher Rights, Tenure, Teacher Improvement Plans, Progressive Discipline Processes, Teacher Due Process Proceedings, Difficult Conversations, and Recommendations for...

3. Customized Sessions

An online questionnaire will automatically be sent to participating administrators prior to the training session to ascertain administrator knowledge, areas of concern, or greatest areas of need. This is done to provide a professional development experience which is relevant and useful.  To provide the best fit for the district, QPS staff will also review all pertinent state statutes and identify any relevant language in board policy and/or the teachers’  negotiated agreement prior to the...

4. Administrator Training

A two-day session to provide training and materials for administrators who have the responsibility for evaluating, developing, improving, and/or dismissing teachers.  The session provides a step-by-step process administrators follow to help them identify, document, and recommend employment changes or dismissal for chronically under-performing...

5. Follow-up

A 1/2-day or full-day re-training or consultation with individual administrators to promote additional learning, answer questions, or troubleshoot ongoing personnel issues....
10 ways technology transforms student learning:

10 ways technology transforms student learning:...

1). Technology elevates the depth and scope of learning that can occur in the classroom.2). Technology brings relevance and a certain level of ‘freshness’ to the content.3). Technology shifts the role of the educator and empowers students to take control of their learning.4). Technology provides opportunities to amplify student voices and expand overall reach.5). Technology connects experts and those ‘in the know’ to students and their learning. 6). Technology increases the speed and accuracy of students getting feedback to further guide their learning.7). Technology provides opportunities for students to get a more personalized learning experience.8). Technology builds independence and capacity to be a self-learner.9). Technology creates a platform for students to raise awareness about a cause and/or initiate change toward a cause.10). Technology becomes a bridge between what kids hope for and what is currently...
10 things students want all teachers to know

10 things students want all teachers to know...

1). Students want you to actually spend the time to get to know them...Get to know your students by name as soon as possible. Learn something unique about them and find out what makes them tick. Students know when teachers don't know anything about them, so make getting to know your students a top priority.2). Students want to have a voice in the learning process and want to share 'their' way of doing things...Students want learning to be done 'with' them... not 'to' them. Schools are idea factories with a seemingly limitless amount of new and fresh ideas, so it's time we start tapping into that potential. Also, students bring unique perspectives and ways of thinking about life, so let them move up from passenger and let them drive the bus from time to time.3). Students want to be treated with respect and dignity...Students don't magically become motivated when they are embarrassed. They also don't appreciate it when you call them out to make a point and use them as an example. If you wouldn't like somebody doing it to you, then don't do it to your students.4). Students want to be 'appropriately' challenged with meaningful and relevant learning experiences...Students learn pretty quickly the differences between meaningful and productive...
The First 90 Days: A Reflection and Lessons Learned

The First 90 Days: A Reflection and Lessons Learned...

My main man… Corell About 90 days ago, I embarked on a new venture as the Principal of Lakeside Middle School. I used the book, “First 90 Days” as a guide to help me transition into the school and my new role. Throughout the process I am gaining knowledge on so much: learning, teaching, leading, and the most important part… people! “Where have you been?”  In my last post (First 13 Days) I was able to capture the initial transition, which was April 2, 2016 and, now today is June 26, 2016. It is not as if I lost internet connection or my blog expired, but there was no way I could get back to here until now! For me blogging is an ebb and flow, blogging every day for a year or taking time off balances it all out. Honestly, there was a little blogger guilt that I wasn’t able to get back here, but I believe it was due more to the sheer volume of change and transition I was experiencing. I did get a few messages from friends asking if I was OK, I was more than OK, I was focused on the task at hand. Lakeside Running Man Challenge – What Teachers do When the Students Leave Reflection on...
5 ways to gauge student engagement: #edchat

5 ways to gauge student engagement: #edchat...

Student engagement... a topic that is commonplace in schools and school districts around the world. The goal being that we want to have highly engaging classrooms where our students are intimately and passionately engaged in whatever task they are working on.Engaged classrooms are where learning occurs and one of the defining characteristics of a great teacher is the ability to have his/her students engaged in learning.But...I find student engagement to be a tricky and slippery slope at times because how we define student engagement can vary from educator to educator.For example, when looking at a student who is working and doing what they are supposed to be doing, can we automatically assume they are engaged? Are they cognitively engaged or are they merely compliant and obedient? What about the kid who is passionately doodling and completely ignoring whatever the rest of the students and class are doing? Do we assume the student is not cognitively engaged because the student isn't compliant and obedient?My point is simple... student engagement and the gauging of student engagement really aren't as easy or straightforward as some would think.Also worth noting... I believe most of our kids are truly engaged at most times during the day. The question is... are they engaged in what...
10 questions every teacher should ask themselves: #edchat #ntchat

10 questions every teacher should ask themselves: #edchat #ntchat...

1). What percent of your students are going beyond just compliance and are actually cognitively engaged in deep self-driven and relevant learning?2). How often are students in your class offered the opportunity to move around and get 'the blood' flowing with some type of physical activity?3). How often are kids in your class able to work in teams and work collaboratively on some type of group learning activity?4). When was the last time you read a professional book or article and you tried something new as a result of what you read in the book/article?5). If you had to describe the perfect and ideal classroom, what would be your top three most important characteristics?6). How confident are you that your students could tell someone who doesn't teach what you teach specifically where they are struggling and where they are succeeding in regard to their learning?7). Let's assume audio was recorded for an entire week in your classroom. Of all the voices that are heard during that time, whose voice do you believe would be heard the most?8). If you eliminated all the grades in your classroom, do you think students would still actively participate and continue learning?9). If a group of teachers from another school district who taught a...
Subjectivity in grading … #sblchat

Subjectivity in grading … #sblchat

Take a moment to read this excerpt below from a Tom Guskey article:If you're a student, are these results realistic to what you experience in your classes with your teachers?If you're a teacher, would you agree with these two studies based on conversations you've had with your colleagues?If you're an administrator, how could you ever truly support and defend your teachers in an environment like this?If you're a parent, how confusing could these levels of subjectivity be in understanding what your son/daughter actually knows?This level of grading subjectivity is plaguing classrooms all over the world...Maybe this 100 year old study should be 'refreshed' and...

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First and foremost, it is truly a grand expression of what you can help others do, and – more importantly – WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE. BRAVO!
Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser, Attitude Concepts for Today
5 ways to gauge student engagement: #edchat